Black Rumped Flameback Can Be A Great Pet

If you’re looking for a unique pet, the black rumped flameback may be the right choice for you. These birds are intelligent and easy to train, and they make fascinating companions.

Also there are many types of woodpeckers in the world, but the black-rumped flameback.

Also known as the lesser golden-backed woodpecker or lesser goldenback, is a woodpecker found widely distributed in the Indian subcontinent, and they make great pets.

It is one of the few woodpeckers that are seen in urban areas. It has a characteristic rattling-whinnying call and an undulating flight.

What is a Black Rumped Flameback and Where Does it Live?

Black Rumped Flameback
Black Rumped Flameback

The Black Rumped Flameback is a type of bird that is found in Southeast Asia. They are not endangered and can be found in the dense forests.

The Black Rumped Flameback has a black tail and a bright red chest. They are about the size of a chicken and can live up to 25 years in captivity.

Scientific Classification of the Black Rumped Flameback

The Black Rumped Flameback (Dinopium Benghalense) is similar to the Black Rumped Babbler (Turdoides striata).

It is larger, a little shorter and a little lighter than its cousin. The black rump patch is very obvious.

  • Scientific Name: Dinopium Benghalense
  • Kingdom: Animalia
  • Phylum: Chordata
  • Class: Aves
  • Order: Piciformes
  • Family: Picidae
  • Genus: Dinopium
  • Species: Dinopium Benghalense

Etymology:

The genus Dinopium is derived from the Greek word “dinops,” meaning “a little owl.” This is a reference to the fact that this genus resembles a little owl.

The species name, benghalense, refers to the Bengal region of India where this species is believed to be native.

Behaviour:

Similar to its cousin, the black rumped flameback is a very agile and swift insectivorous bird. It is a true tree hugger, it rarely strays from trees.

This species is the common name used for birds found in the Indian subcontinent and in the hills of Sri Lanka.

The black rumped flameback is a very beautiful small tree bird. It is usually seen alone and feeds mostly on insects.

Breeding:

The male and the female are monogamous and the only one. They build a nest high in the treetops.

Their nests are built from moss, roots and spider threads. The nest is usually 5 to 7 feet above the ground and is covered with a thick green leafy substance. The female lays the eggs in May to June.

The eggs are white, with brown blotches. The eggs are a small green. The eggs usually hatch from 30 to 40 days.

Both parents feed the young chicks and they stay with the parents until they leave the nest.

Migration:

Black rumped flameback is a resident bird. They are always found in areas near water like streams, ponds, and marshes.

Calls:

The black rumped flameback has a very characteristic and unique call. It has a high pitched call that is very loud. It calls in low shrubs and high up in trees. The males have a deep-toned warbling song.

Distribution and Habitat:

The black rumped flameback can be found from India to Myanmar, north eastern Burma, Thailand, Cambodia and Malaya.

It is widely distributed in forests and also around villages and towns. It can also be found in cultivated areas.

Subspecies:

The black rumped flameback is widely distributed and the species is classified into 7 subspecies, based on geographical and morphological differences.

Dinopium Benghalense Subspecies

1. Benghalense. Boddaert, 1783. Found from India and Sri Lanka south to Thailand, Cambodia and Malaya. They have red colour throats.

2. Tethydroides. Temminck and Schlegel, 1848. They are smaller and found in Bangladesh. The male is slightly larger than the female.

3. Vinax. Jerdon, 1870. Found in Assam and northern Burma.

4. Gabidulina. Jerdon, 1870. Found in Southern India and western Sri Lanka. It has pale yellowish greyish wings.

5. Rufilineatum. Bonaparte, 1856. They are found in Myanmar. The female is larger than the male and has a black line across the breast.

6. Sanguinala. Sclater, 1872. They are found in Bangladesh and Assam.

7. Hosidai. Hartert, 1900. The population is found only in Western Ghats. The calls of male and female are very different. The male’s call is a very high pitched trill.

Black Rumped Flameback Facts

The bird will sit tight for any predators and it will not move unless it is necessary.

The males and females will call to each other.

The black rumped flameback is a very agile and swift bird.

It will sometimes run through a bush and climb up a tree.

It can also fly very high up in trees.

The black rumped flameback is a very vocal bird and can call for help when it is attacked.

The call is loud, very shrill and lasts for 3 to 4 seconds.

The breeding season is from May to July.

The male and the female call each other, especially in the early morning.

The female lays 5 to 6 eggs. The chicks will fledge from 15 to 20 days. When a threat is near, it will sit up straight with its neck raised.

When the bird is disturbed, it will call loudly.

When they want to cross a stream, they will do a short flight.

They cannot fly far distances.

The eggs of the black rumped flameback are very small and greenish.

The black rumped flameback is an omnivorous bird and will eat insects and seeds.

What are the Causes of the Declining Population and Why Should We Care?

This section is about the causes of the declining population and why we should care about it. The first cause is that there are less children being born.

The second cause is that people are living longer lives. The third cause is that people are having fewer children.

People are living longer lives because they have better healthcare and they live in cleaner environments.

People are having fewer children because of social, economic, and environmental reasons.

What can be Done to Save the Black Rumped Flameback from Extinction?

The black-rumped flameback is a bird species that is native to the Indian subcontinent.

It is one of the most popular birds in India and Bangladesh and it has been on the International Union for Conservation of Nature’s Red List since 1994.

We can save the black-rumped flameback from extinction by conserving its habitat, controlling their predators, and breeding them in captivity.

Conclusion:

There are many types of woodpeckers in the world, but the black-rumped flameback.

Also known as the lesser golden-backed woodpecker or lesser goldenback, is a woodpecker found widely distributed in the Indian subcontinent, and they make great pets.

It is one of the few woodpeckers that are seen in urban areas. It has a characteristic rattling-whinnying call and an undulating flight.

I hope you enjoyed our article about black rumped flameback. If yes, then do share these articles with your loved ones, family, and friends.

Thank you for Reading!

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