Birds of Massachusetts Amazing Top 21 Birds in Massachusetts

Hey dude, If you are a fan of birds or would like to learn more about them, then take a look at this article for the top 21 Birds of Massachusetts. With a wide variety of habitats, Massachusetts is a great place to find birds.

Here we’ve rounded up the top birds of Massachusetts based on their habitats and where we’ve encountered them most often.

Top 21 Birds of Massachusetts

Here are listed top 21 birds of Massachusetts with photo.

Blue Gray Gnatcatcher
Birds of Massachusetts Amazing Top 21 Birds in Massachusetts
Blue Gray Gnatcatcher

Blue Gray Gnatcatcher is my favorite bird to see along the shores of Massachusetts. Gnatcatchers are most common at the beaches where they are seen feeding on salt marsh grass and insects.

You can often spot them in coastal habitats, but they are certainly seen all over Massachusetts and often in large numbers. If you find yourself on an urban lake, or a private lake/pond, be sure to take note of the birds feeding.

You might just be able to get a glimpse of a flock of Blue-gray Gnatcatchers.

Brown Thrasher
Birds of Massachusetts Amazing Top 21 Birds in Massachusetts
Brown Thrasher

Brown Thrasher are not common throughout the state, but a few populations can be found in the south and central parts of the state.

Although Thrashers can be found in most Massachusetts habitats, the best places to spot them are suburban habitats such as gardens and parks. They are often found feeding on garden feeders, and they will often hang out in shrubbery and leaf piles.

Eastern Bluebird
Birds of Massachusetts Amazing Top 21 Birds in Massachusetts
Eastern Bluebird

The eastern bluebirds are often in evidence in most Massachusetts habitats. While most can be found in woodlands, the best places to spot them are at feeders and gardens.

They are typically seen in trees in suburban habitats, so if you live in a more rural area you may be able to spot them more often.

Eastern Towhee
Birds of Massachusetts Amazing Top 21 Birds in Massachusetts
Eastern Towhee

Eastern Towhee can be found in most Massachusetts habitats, but they tend to be more commonly seen in wooded areas and the coastal habitat.

There are several different subspecies of this species, and depending on where you live, there might be more than one you are able to spot.

Common Redpoll
Birds of Massachusetts Amazing Top 21 Birds in Massachusetts
Common Redpoll

Common Redpoll are small birds that are easily missed due to their small size. They are also commonly confused for Starlings due to their colorful plumage.

Redpolls are typically found in coniferous forests and prairie grassland. If you see a single bird, odds are it is not a redpoll, but a small red-eyed bird.

White Throated Sparrow
6 out of 21 birds of Massachusetts
White Throated Sparrow

White Throated Sparrow can be hard to find due to its small size. However, they are very common in most parts of the state, and they tend to be found in open woodlands.

If you ever spot a lone sparrow, you may want to look at the ground near it for small insects or other small insects to feed on.

Blue Crowned Chickadee
Blue Crowned Chickadee 7 out of 21 birds in Massachusetts
Blue Crowned Chickadee

Most people notice the large blue cap of the Blue-Crowned Chickadee because of the prominent color difference. However, there is a small crest on the bird’s head that many people overlook.

The bird’s eye-line and under the tail make up the large, round eyes that allow for seeing so well in the forest.

American Kestrel
American Kestrel 8 out of 21 birds in Massachusetts
American Kestrel

American Kestrel are small, brown falcons that are often seen flying along the coast. American Kestrel is one of the rarest and most difficult birds to see in Massachusetts.

The species is considered endangered, and it is often a target for farmers because it attacks chickens and other domestic birds.

Eastern Meadowlark
Eastern Meadowlark 9 out of 21 birds in Massachusetts
Eastern Meadowlark

Eastern Meadowlark is the common name for a family of grassland birds. They are very common throughout Massachusetts. They prefer areas with open habitats and fields of green grass.

Because of their large size, the meadowlark is one of the easiest birds to spot. If you’re in Massachusetts, be sure to look for them while walking, hiking, or driving.

Hooded Warbler
Hooded Warbler 10 out of 21 birds in Massachusetts
Hooded Warbler

Hooded Warbler are very common in the fall months in Massachusetts. They are small, yellow warblers that often inhabit wetlands or areas with marshy ground.

The name comes from the hood that extends across the bird’s head. While they do not migrate, hooded warblers are very good fliers that enjoy flying as far away from the ground as possible.

Common Rose Breasted Grosbeaks
Common Rose Breasted Grosbeak 11 out of 21 birds of Massachusetts
Common Rose Breasted Grosbeak

Common Rose Breasted Grosbeak, these small birds are members of the American Rose Family and make their home in trees and shrubs. They are great fliers and great singers.

A rosy breast is a common characteristic. Most rose-breasted grosbeaks live in woodlands and are usually found near streams and marshes.

Cedar Waxwing
Cedar Waxwing 12 out of 21 birds of Massachusetts
Cedar Waxwing

Massachusetts is home to the Cedar Waxwing. These birds are medium-sized with a body that is mostly white and a very distinct yellow tail. They are very good fliers and often eat berries in the fall.

Greater Yellowlegs
Greater Yellowlegs 13 out of 21 birds of Massachusetts
Greater Yellowlegs

Greater Yellowlegs is one of the most common shorebirds in Massachusetts. Most people in the region have likely seen them. While they prefer salt marshes, they are also found along rivers and streams.

It is a very friendly bird and is often encountered while out walking or driving.

Golden Cheeked Warbler
Golden Cheeked Warbler 14 out of 21 birds of Massachusetts
Golden Cheeked Warbler

Golden Cheeked Warbler is a small, yellow-bellied member of the New World warbler family. While it was once widespread across North America, it has mostly become rare. Most of the birds living in Massachusetts are native, but they have been introduced into many other parts of the world.

Gray Catbird
Gray Catbird 15 out of 21 birds of Massachusetts
Gray Catbird

Gray Catbird is medium-sized bird, this is known for its ability to mimic sounds. It is one of the most common birds in its region of the world. It is often seen along busy streets, where they sing their signature song.

Least Tern
Least Tern 16 out of 21 birds of Massachusetts
Least Tern

Least Tern is one of the smaller birds that live on the coast. It is a sea bird that feeds in the water. Its wings are folded to half its length when it dives into the water. During the winter, the birds live on an ice covered pond. Most of these birds are found in salt marshes.

Purple Gallinule
Purple Gallinule 17 out of 21 birds of Massachusetts
Purple Gallinule

Purple Gallinule are small ducks were first seen on the coast, where they are still seen today. Most of the breeding birds are gray with a black neck and a white band on the face. They are mostly found on brackish marshes.

Ruddy Duck
Ruddy Duck 18 out of 21 birds of Massachusetts
Ruddy Duck

Ruddy Duck is a medium-sized duck with green plumage and a black cap on its head. These ducks can be found on the coast and in brackish marshes. They are found in small flocks.

Baird’s Sandpiper
Baird's Sandpiper 19 out of 21 birds of Massachusetts
Baird’s Sandpiper

Baird’s Sandpiper is one of the largest and most common birds that can be found along the shore. Most of these birds spend most of their lives on an ice covered pond during the winter. They are also common in coastal areas. The birds are brown and black and have a brown crown and a white throat. They have long wings that are used for both swimming and diving.

Laughing Gull
Laughing Gull 20 out of 21 birds of Massachusetts
Laughing Gull

Laughing Gull is a large seagull that flies all over the coast and is found near the shore. These birds can be found during the summer. They have a thick black bill, a yellow beak and large white wings.

Double Crested Cormorant
Double Crested Cormorant 21 out of 21 birds of Massachusetts
Double Crested Cormorant

Double Crested Cormorant is an unusual cormorant with two crests on its head. These birds feed on fish, squid and crustaceans and their diet can be found all over the world. The birds are white and black and have a large crest.

The Rare Birds in Massachusetts

Massachusetts is home to many different types of bird life, including the Black-capped Chickadee, the Red-breasted Nuthatch, and the Tufted Titmouse. The Black-capped Chickadee (Poecile atricapillus) is a small songbird that can be found in western Massachusetts. They are migratory birds. They are rarely seen during winter months because they migrate south for warmer climates. The Red-breasted Nuthatch (Sitta canadensis) is also a migratory bird that can usually be seen in late winter and early spring when it arrives in Massachusetts after traveling to warmer climates for the winter months. The Tufted Titmouse (Baeolophus bicolor) is a permanent resident of Massachusetts year round.

The Benefits of Bird Watching

There are many benefits of bird watching. It’s a great way to get in touch with nature and it can also provide mental health benefits. Bird watching has been shown to alleviate stress, anxiety, depression, and seasonal affective disorder. The hobby is a low-intensity physical activity which can also help improve sleep patterns for those who struggle with insomnia.

Bird Watching Sites in Massachusetts

  • Nantucket: Nantucket Whaling Museum, Hatches Harbor Lagoon.

Where to Find Birds in Massachusetts

Massachusetts is an excellent place to observe many different species of birds. Ornithologists say that the best time to see birds is in the spring when they are migrating, while some bird-watchers say that autumn is prime time. The New England region of the US has some 12,000 identified species of birds with more being discovered every year.

Interesting Facts About Birds

The first bird that comes to mind is the iconic bald eagle. While these majestic, American symbols still exist in the Commonwealth, they are no longer as prevalent as they once were and now breed mainly in Maine and Canada. The osprey is one of the most common raptors on Cape Cod and Martha’s Vineyard; merlin falcons prey on smaller birds, especially sparrows; and blue jays are present throughout Massachusetts but absent from Cape Cod (except for nesting season).

The Large Birds of Massachusetts

The Large birds are primarily shorebirds, herons, gulls, and eagles.

The Small birds in Massachusetts

The small birds are primarily songbirds, waterfowl, warblers, and woodpeckers.

Types of Birds in Massachusetts

There are many types of birds that can be found in Massachusetts. There are more than 300 species of birds that have been identified including cardinals, hawks, herons, crows, owls, grackles, blue jays, blackbirds and robins. The types of birds vary depending on the location.

What Types of Habitats Do These Birds Prefer?

Birds are an integral part of the ecosystem. They provide a valuable role as pollinators and seed dispersers. There are many different types of habitats that these birds prefer. Some of these habitats include tropical rainforest, deciduous forest, coniferous forest, mangroves.

FAQs:

What is a Habitat?

A habitat is the natural environment where an organism lives and grows.

How Long Do They Live and How Large is?

The maximum lifespan for a northern pike has been recorded as 10 years. In the wild, they have been known to live up to 16 years. They have an average length of 3-4 feet and can weigh from 15-30 pounds.

What are the black birds in Massachusetts?

Black birds are not indigenous to Massachusetts. The term “black bird” is an old Native-American idiom for a crow.

Conclusion:

In this blog post, we’ve reviewed 21 amazing birds of Massachusetts that you can find in Massachusetts. It is a list of the most popular birds in the state. It has been compiled by two ornithologists who have observed these birds and their habitats for a considerable length of time. Now that you have a better idea of the birds that call this state home, it’s time to get outside and start your bird watching adventure. I hope you enjoyed our article about birds of Massachusetts. If yes, then do share these articles with your loved ones, family, and friends.

Thank you for Reading!

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